BlogFest, Letters to the editor, etc

Here's a good example of the challenge the gay community faces in the struggle for our full civil rights:

Democracy spoke

This letter is in regard to the photo of the Proposition 8 protest in the Region section of last Sunday's paper. While I understand the disappointment felt by those who support homosexual/lesbian marriage, I am quite baffled by their continuing protest in the wake of the vote on Proposition 8 in California.

In a true democracy the electorate vote directly on the issues, and this is exactly what occurs when a referendum is placed on the ballot. The people of California have spoken and the actions of those who desired a no vote on the proposition amount to nothing more than whining.

What would they think if those opposing the election of Barack Obama were now in the streets loudly protesting the results, which coincidentally mirror the results of the Proposition 8 vote? Get over it. If you feel strongly on this topic then begin working toward a new referendum and how you can convince the populace to see your point of view. Still be prepared for them to disagree, and if they do, please do not whine.

FRED STOCK
McCandless

First, why the distinction between homosexuals and lesbians?  That's a new one. 

Second, we do not live in a true democracy.  Those with voting power weren't exactly eager to extend civil rights to African-Americans, were they?  It took direct action, education and outreach to bring about change.  Bringing about another referendum will clearly only work if the gay community gets our messages in front of more people — we have to persuade them.

Third, Mr. Stock, I take exception with your categorization of anti-Prop 8 protests as “whining.”  The 500 something people who turned out last week for the protest were vocal and focused and positive.  I was there and I heard not a single whine.  I heard people laughing, chanting, chatting, sharing their stories and creating the kind of momentum that is necessary to bring about change.  I've been following efforts to channel that energy into something positive for Pittsburgh, such as the County Anti-Discrimination Legislation.  Calls to action — to democratic action — are being sounded.  The Mayor is seeking nominations for an LGBT Advisory Committee. 

Rest assured, Mr. Stock, that change is coming.  We can feel it in the air and we intend to keep exercising our civil liberties — assembling, dissenting, voting, speaking, etc– to promote change and the justice necessary to treat all citizens fairly.  You and others are entitled to disagree.  Kudos to you for writing a letter.  I'm disappointed that our allies didn't write letters from another perspective so point to your side on this one.

Friday was my first blogfest.  I met a handful of new folks, including another LGBT blogger (look in the blogroll for Jason Cable).  I got to catch up with David.  I had no idea whom half the people in the room were as I had to leave early to meet Ledcat.  Still, I went and that's new for me. 

Tomorrow is my first day on the new job.  I am excited and nervous.  I was hoping a kicky beret might help, but none are to be found at Lesbian Central.  I did dig out two winter caps and at least 7 single unmatched gloves.  When your hands are cold, does it really matter if the gloves match?  Really?

Tonight, we take Ana over to her potential dog sitter for a trial visit.  This is the determining factor in our trip to DC for the LGBT Blogging Initiative.  I discovered that we are being treated to an exclusive screening of “Milk” and a luncheon with Barney Frank.  Plus, Pam Spaulding from Pam's House Blend will be there to talk with us.  The HRC is hosting something as is the Victory Fund and other groups.  Plus, the invited Ledcat to join me. And I might get to have dinner with my college friend Karin.  I am tres excited. 

No whining!

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