Four (Apparent) Wins on Marriage Equality

Let me preface by sharing that Washington votes by mail so that referendum decision won’t be finalized for a few days.

But last night was breathtaking in that fact that marriage equality had three solid wins.

Rob Rogers Pittsburgh Post Gazette 2004

In Maryland, voters approved a referendum on the marriage equality law passed by the State Legislature 52-48%.

Maine approved a similar measure by a slightly wider vote 53-47%

In Minnesota, voters rejected a constitutional amendment restricting the definition of marriage to one man, one woman.

From The Blade:

Alaska and Hawaii were the first states to bar same-sex nuptials in their constitutions in 1998. Nebraska and Nevada followed in 2000 and 2002 respectively, then in 2004, 13 states voted to add amendments to their constitutions: Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon and Utah. Kansas and Texas followed in 2005, while Alabama, Colorado, Idaho, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia and Wisconsin followed in 2006. Since then California, Florida and North Carolina have all also amended their state constitutions to bar same-sex marriages and — in some cases — civil unions and other forms of domestic contracts as well, bringing to 31 the number of states that do.

Before election night, six states and the District of Columbia have extended the full rights and obligations of marriage to same-sex couples: Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York and Vermont.

Also before election night, nine states had barred same-sex marriage in law, but not through constitutional amendment: Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, New Jersey, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, West Virginia and Wyoming.

 

In Washington, a referendum legalizing marriage equality is on the path to victory with final results expected in a few days.

Hence, the historic monumental ass-kicking of the far right last night.  Onward to ENDA.

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