Blogging Summit: The Preview

It is the eve of the LGBT Blogging Initiative/Summit in Washington, DC and what fun we've had getting here.  I was late getting out of work so we got really behind leaving Pgh.  We made it to the kennel with literally 6 minutes to spare before they closed.  We drove through snow in the Laurel Highlands.  We ate bad food at a reststop.  I learned that my damn $25 Starbucks “member” card doesn't work at every Starbucks.  We got lost in NW DC and nearly set up camp at a bus shelter.  Our very ritzy hotel has a great view and very attentive staff.  It didn't have cups in the room, “complimentary” coffee or free wireless access.  We took the concierge's advice on dinner at a local Italian restaurant where we got pegged as cheap non-alcohol consuming women and had horrendous service, while the same waitperson gave outstanding service to the heterosexual couples and families surrounding us. (I REALLY HATE THIS because I am a great tipper).  One $3.50 can of soda later … we are watching television and listening to the bar revelers and hotel muzak. 

On the bright side, our little Ana is greatly enjoying her “band camp” experience and Aunt Debby has sent us multiple photos of Ana essentially taking over the household in less than 10 hours.  I was wrong about forgetting to lock the doors to my car.  I'm with Ledcat.  People have been pretty nice (except for the server).

And I'm excited about the conference.  Meeting Pam Spaulding will be a real highlight.  Tomorrow, as they say, is another day. 

A few other thoughts …

Yesterday, I wrote about Marty Levine's article in the City Paper covering the Anti-Prop 8 Momentum in Pittsburgh. I overlooked a related article on the progress of the County Anti-Discrimination legislation which is much more significant for Pittsburgh queers than Prop 8.  Go check that out.  We'll revisit this issue in more detail after the conference.

Something that struck me as Ledcat and I drove to DC was that Marty only interviewed (or at least quoted) young adults connected with the universities while dissecting the generational divide in local LGBT advocacy efforts.  I agree that there is a disconnect, but I wonder what he would have found had he ventured into Pegasus, Your Inner Vagabond or the Ava Lounge to talk with young queer adults who are not students?  Would there be a difference?  It was a relatively young group that organized the Dyke March, but the turnout was pretty diverse in terms of age.  So I wonder what the paradigm looks like when you factor in socio-economic status and transitory residency versus permanent residency? 

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