I was for Edwards. Now what?

I am seriously flummoxed by the decision to be made — Obama or Clinton.  A lot of my progressive friends are very pro-Obama.  And I find that I *want* to be on his team, too. 

But I just can't make the leap.  Thanks to Steel City Stonewall Democrats for links to some comparisons on LGBTQ issues, courtesy of the HRC and the Gay Men's Health Crisis. There aren't a lot of differences. 

It really comes down to a few issues for me and they are all from my gut.  First, the people trying the hardest to convert me to Team Obama are men who in their critique of Hillary veer a little too close to the “assertive women are divisive mentality” for my comfort. 

Second, Obama had ex-gay fringe christian Donnie McClurkin on his parade o' supporters and that scares the livin' hell out of me.  I am afraid that Obama is going to get caught between appeasing the homophobia of some (I say some) African-American churches and defending the civil rights of gay Americans.  That's just as unappealing as Huckabee pandering to the evangelical, homo-hatin' base. Not everything can be as neatly finessed at City Councilman Ricky Burgess handling of the recent pro-gay resolution.  Not that I'm okay with being finessed, but I can sure as hell see a point at which there is a clear moral line on which President Obama is going to have to stand. 

You know from whom I have not heard?  Progressive women supporting Obama.  Women that I actually know.  Progressive women who believe in a trans-inclusive ENDA and gay marrriage (the real cahuna).  Are you out there in Pittsburgh, blog-reading land?

I am really sorry that the rich white Southern guy — the one who talked about poverty — dropped out.  I hope he makes a fine Attorney General (minus the prayer circles and pro-torture memos).

  • Honest question — since it's that close and agonizing a call, how about basing the decision on something *other* than identity politics and civil rights?
    How about character? How about war and peace? How about legislative approach? How about the complications of having 42 so close to power?

  • I am a GWM and personally don't have a problem with Hilliary but I do with “Clinton” I am not ready to commit 2012 to a Republican Presidency and 8 years of “but Clinton did it” which I foresee if she wins. Just remember no President was elected on a platform of civil rights they had to be pushed into it when elected, we cannot expect a candidate to have a progressive platform until we get them elected and fight hard to push them towards it and I believe Obama has that integrity to listen and follow the peoples influence. I also think the PA primary will play an integral role this year.

  • A. Hurd is very much behind Obama. In fact, I've been wearing an “Obama 2008” t-shirt since 2006. I've been a fan since my Chicago days.

  • Don't dismiss identity politics. Donnie McClurkin and the ex-gay movement want to cure me from my identity. Moreover, he has proclaimed that he is at war with gay people. At war is not an idle threat. I don't understand why Obama would want to associate his campaign with that perspective. It is divisive and hateful. I am seriously disturbed at this association and worry about the policy implications for my entire community.
    It is easy to dismiss this as single issue politics except that it is a heckuva lot of issues impacting my actual life.

  • I think it's a mistake to consider McClurkin a “Fringe” element. While he may be lesser known in White Christian circles, he is a huge Gospel Music star and well respected Pastor in mainstream Black Christian enclaves. While it's an interesting question to ask what Obama's ties to him may say about his stance on LBGT issues, the more interesting question is: Why is Obama, a Muslim, aligning himself with any Christian movement?

  • Obama is a Christian. I believe he belongs to the Church of Christ. His father was raised Muslim, but became an athiest. Plus, his father didn't raise him. I believe Obama's mother was a non-practicing Christian. But my understanding is that he has affirmed his identity as a Christian within the Church of Christ faith community.

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